UK Digital Economy Crucible Alumni

Meet the future Digital Economy leaders.

UK Digital Economy Crucible 2017

UK Digital Economy Crucible 2017 Alumni photo
UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Adeline Paiement
Computer Science
Swansea University

Adeline is a lecturer in data science at Swansea University. She originally studied astrophysics at the University of Strasbourg, then did a PhD and postdoc in computer vision and machine learning at the University of Bristol, with applications to healthcare. This mixed background has enriched Adeline’s research, giving her a taste for working across disciplines and exploring how AI may assist in everyday life.

She is now collaborating with various partners in medical and psychology research labs to devise methods and tools that help deepen our understanding of health conditions and devising interventions.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Alvin Orbaek White
Engineering
Swansea University

Alvin is a chemist (PhD) with a history of physics (BSc), and is now a senior lecturer in the College of Engineering at Swansea University, having just arrived from MIT (Department of Engineering). He is developing new methods to make ultra-long single walled carbon nanotubes for use as electricity cables.

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are ballistic electron conductors that can be hundreds to thousands of times more conductive than copper. The vision is to augment current materials with CNTs, investigate ways to route electricity more effectively (smart grid), to source carbon from greenhouse gasses and industrial waste, to maintain a circular economy.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Amy Jenkins
Psychology
Swansea University

Amy Jenkins is post-doctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Psychology, at Swansea University. Amy has an MSc in Sport Psychology, and an MSc in Neuropsychology. She has worked on a number of large multi-site projects including the ‘Alzheimer’s and Genetics’ project, the ‘Brains for Dementia’ study at Cardiff University, and the ‘Cognitive Function and Ageing Study’ at Swansea University.

Amy has an interest in the characterisation of subjective cognitive impairment (SCI); visual attention related processing, memory, anxiety, depression, personality and quality of life; the care pathways for people with SCI: the impact on the person, the health service and what can be done to improve it; the use of mobile technology for testing older adults cognitive functioning: design and usability of digital devices, the monitoring of cognitive functioning, and creative collaborative working.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Angela Dy
Entrepreneurship
Loughborough University London

Angela Martinez Dy is Lecturer in Entrepreneurship at the Glendonbrook Institute for Enterprise Development at Loughborough University in London. Her interest in entrepreneurship stems from her experience building grassroots arts organisations in her hometown of Seattle, USA, where she was co-founder and Program Director for Youth Speaks Seattle, a leading creative writing and performing arts education organisation for youth.

Angela holds an MSc (Dist) Entrepreneurship and PhD in digital enterprise from Nottingham University Business School, and a double major BA Creative Writing and Mathematics from the University of Washington. Her other research interests include intersectionality, cyberfeminism, and critical realist philosophy.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Caitlin Cottril
Geography and Environment
Aberdeen University

Caitlin Cottrill is Lecturer in Digital Economy in the Department of Geography and Environment at the University of Aberdeen. She is affiliated with the Centre for Transport Research, and her primary research focuses on the use of data and technology in encouraging active and public transport modes. Caitlin has also worked extensively in the area of privacy, particularly in the protection of personally identifying spatio-temporal information.

These combined interests contribute to an underlying interest in traveller surveys, and in exploring the roles that social media can play in disseminating transport information.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Chiara Bernardi
Digital Media
University of Stirling

Chiara Livia Bernardi holds a PhD from the Centre of Interdisciplinary Methodologies at the University of Warwick, England. She used digital methodologies to analyse the multiple meanings of women’s issues in a Middle Eastern context merging Islamic feminist exegesis, digital humanities, Actor Network Theory and Software Studies. Prior to re-joining academia, Chiara worked for 10 years in the media business, working as a business and media analyst and moving to strategy and consultancy while studying for her PhD.

She moved to Switzerland after being awarded a postdoctoral fellowship by the Institute of Digital Humanities at the EPFL, the Swiss Technology Institute. She is currently a lecturer in Digital Media. Her current research focuses on the role of missing data – from a political as well as statistical perspective – in the construction of the “European Migrant Crisis”.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Dafne Morgado Ramirez
Biomedical Engineering/HCI
University College London

Dafne is a Biomedical Engineer and Research Associate at University College London, exploring the appropriateness and interaction opportunities of manual wheelchairs with power assist devices. Prior to joining the Interaction Centre, her first postdoctoral position was at the UCL Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science in the Wearable Assistive Materials project. Her research interests are human-computer interactions, e-health, biomechanics, biomedical instrumentation and signal processing, assistive and wearable technology, accessibility and product design.

Dafne is looking for research opportunities in pets-computer and pets-humans interactions. She is part of the community of the Global Disability Innovation Hub and the Global Cooperation on Assistive Technology from the World Health Organization.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Edina Harbinja
Law
University of Hertfordshire

Edina is a senior lecturer in law and the Masters in Law (LLM) programme leader at the University of Hertfordshire. Her PhD analyses legal issues surrounding transmission of digital assets on death, using case studies of online games, emails and social networks. In her research, Edina explores the application of property, contract law, intellectual property and privacy online, particularly after death. One of her primary research interests is the concept of post-mortem privacy, i.e. privacy of the deceased individuals.

Edina’s research has a policy and multidisciplinary focus, and aims to explore different options of regulation of online behaviours and phenomena.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Enrico Andreoli
Engineering
Swansea University

Enrico Andreoli is a chemist working at the crossroad of energy, environment, and sustainability. Enrico's research, teaching, and outreach activities aim to pave the way towards a strategic use of resources for a sustainable energy future. Having worked in a variety of research fields including materials and renewable energy both in industry and academia, his current research focuses on developing novel materials and processes for carbon dioxide capture and utilisation.

Instrumental to this are also his collaborative engagement activities with policymakers and the wider public, including producing a short innovative film about energy sustainability. Enrico is a Senior Lecturer at the Energy Safety Research Institute of Swansea University.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Ewa Lugar
Human Computer Interaction
University of Edinburgh

Ewa holds a Chancellor’s Fellowship at the University of Edinburgh, based within the Design Informatics group, where she studies applied ethics in the context of machine intelligence. She draws from a background in Political Science, Philosophy, Human- Computer Interaction, and Human Security.

Her research is driven by an interest in design mechanisms by which humans might be supported to understand intelligent systems, and how such systems might be ethically- aligned. Prior to academia, Ewa worked in the field of policy, advocacy and research (Digital Inclusion), and core to her work are questions of how her research might elicit sustainable change that results in social good; media attention, policy impact, education, and industrial impact.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Federico Cerutti
Artificial Intelligence
Cardiff University

Federico is a researcher in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and a lecturer at Cardiff University. His main research aim is to enable machines to express themselves and to effectively communicate with humans - an increasingly important element in this fourth industrial revolution dominated by interconnected intelligent machines, perhaps operating on the basis of distributed machine learning.

His background is mostly in argumentation theory, a branch of AI that has been shown to be well-suited for providing humans with actionable interfaces to automated reasoning on the basis of arguments pro or against claims.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Gemma Webster
HCI/Healthcare
Edinburgh Napier University

Gemma is a lecturer in the School of Computing at Edinburgh Napier University. She was a Research Fellow at the doctoral Digital Economy Research Hub at the University of Aberdeen, and completed her undergraduate degree and PhD in Computing at the University of Dundee. Her principle research interests lie in the field of human computer interaction, health care, older adults, community and assistive technologies.

Gemma is an experienced multidisciplinary researcher who has worked in a number of different environments and areas including healthcare, nature conservation, community organisations and heritage. A key aspect of her research is that it involves ‘real-world’ environments, problems and partners.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Hendrik Baier
Artificial Intelligence
University of York

After studying computer science, linguistics, and cognitive science, Hendrik did a PhD on artificial intelligence for decision-making in games. His interest in AI and machine learning then led to a post-doctoral position at the European Space Agency, and finally as research associate for AI and data analytics, at Digital Creativity Labs in York.

Hendrik is interested in "AI for games” - bringing advanced technology to the entertainment and serious games industries - as well as "games for AI”, pushing AI by using games and their varied challenges as testbeds, slowly ramping up their difficulty to real-world problems requiring human-level intelligence.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr John Stevens
Design
Royal College of Art

John is Senior Tutor for RCA’s MA/MSc in Global Innovation Design, with research interests in application of design methods to social, cross-cultural and humanitarian innovation (products, interactions, systems). He is keen to develop international collaborations, especially in Asia, and particularly around social innovation, trans-cultural exchange, humanitarian innovation and development.

John spent 12 years in industry, five as Head of Design for dot.com tech company with a 12-strong design/UX team in interaction and branding.

BSc Molecular Biology, King's College, London; Master’s Industrial Design Engineering, RCA / Imperial College; PhD Engineering (Strategic Design) Cambridge University; Senior Lecturer Northumbria University.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Kellie Morrissey
HCI/Applied Psychology
Newcastle University

Kellie is a psychologist by background. Her research focuses on the potential for digital design and technology to help people with dementia and their carers to live meaningful and connected lives within their communities.

Kellie undertook her PhD in University College Cork, and within that project she worked within nursing homes to explore the potential for digital musical interactions to create opportunities for performing, connecting, and belonging. Some of her broader research interests are experience-centred design, creative and innovative ways of researching and designing with participants, the role of the arts within health and old age research, and qualitative research methods and analysis of all types.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Larissa Pschetz
Design
University of Edinburgh

Larissa is an interaction designer, researcher, and lecturer based in the Centre for Design Informatics at the University of Edinburgh. Her research is focused on Design and related areas of Human Computer Interaction, Social Sciences and Humanities.

Larissa is particularly interested in socio-technological narratives and how they can influence and be shaped by design practice. Her work concentrates on the development of artefacts and systems, which may attempt to challenge perceptions of time, try to rethink the role of design in the context of biotechnology, or change assumptions around production and supply chains.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Marwan Fayed
Computer Networking
University of Stirling

Marwan Fayed received his MA from Boston University and his PhD from the University of Ottawa, in 2003 and 2009 respectively, and in between he worked at Microsoft as a member of the Core Reliability Group.

He joined the faculty at the University of Stirling in 2009 under the Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA) scheme. He recently held the appointment of Theme Leader for computer networking research in Scotland. His current research interests lie in wireless algorithms, as well as general network, transport, and measurement in next generation edge networks. He is a co-founder of HUBS c.i.c., an ISP focussed on rural communities. He is a recipient of an IEEE CCECE best paper award, and serves on committees at IEEE and ACM conferences.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Mercedes Torres Torres
Human Computer Interaction
University of Nottingham

Mercedes Torres Torres is a Transitional Assistant Professor at the School of Computer Science at the University of Nottingham. She is a member of the Computer Vision Lab and the Horizon Institute. She holds a PhD in Image Processing and Machine Learning from the University of Nottingham, and her background is computer science, with particular focus on machine learning and image analysis/processing.

Her research interests lie at the intersection of computer vision, machine learning and healthcare. She is particularly interested in developing tools for self-monitoring of mental health conditions, particularly bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Her current work focuses on developing new methods to combine deep learning with small and skewed datasets.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Pedro Telles
Law/Public Procurement Regulation
Swansea University

Pedro Telles is an expert in public procurement regulation, interested in analysing the law in context and changing practice. Most of his research to date has a mixed methods approach (law with social sciences and quasi natural experiments) which led to him giving evidence to the Local Authorities Select Committee at Westminster in 2013, and having his research in improving low value procurement adopted by the Federation of Small Businesses in 2014.

Pedro edits with Dr Albert Sanchez Graells an online commentary to the Public Contracts Regulations 2015. He is currently a Senior Lecturer in Law at Swansea University where he lectures EU, Competition and Company Law. Before receiving his PhD on public procurement law, he was a lawyer in Portugal and Spain, advising public and private entities in public procurement and administrative law matters.


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Dr Phil Bartie
Geospatial Technologies
University of Stirling

Phil is a lecturer in geospatial technologies at the University of Stirling. Prior to that he completed a postdoc at the University of Edinburgh. Before moving into academia, Phil worked in a range of technical / programming roles in government and industry, in the UK and New Zealand.

His research focus has been on location based services, spatial databases, urban analytics, and human-computer interaction. He is particularly interested in how spatial models (e.g. LiDAR and visibility modelling) may be used to improve the effectiveness of interactions people have with mobile computers while exploring urban space.


UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Phil Heslop
Human Computer Interaction
Newcastle University

Phil’s interests include Educational Technology - particularly collaborative learning and authoring; Data Visualisation - in particular empowering non-experts to scrutinise data, and graphical applications such as games. He is also a professor of capoeira.

Phil is working on the LinguaCusine project. The aim is for participants to engage in authoring (and trying) technology-enabled cooking tasks in a second language, leading to learning about language, culture, cooking and technology. The project builds on Phil's background in educational technology, and his interest in the use of authoring as a way of promoting collaborative learning and digital inclusion.

UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Phil James
Verification/Computer Science
Swansea University

Phil is currently a lecturer in Computer Science at Swansea University. His research interests lie within the field of mathematical modelling of computer systems in order to ensure their safe and secure operation. In particular, Phillip has worked extensively with the Railway Industry, developing approaches that guarantee the safe and secure operation of railway signalling systems.

Phil has a keen interest in working in close collaboration with industry to ensure not only that knowledge from blue sky research is effectively applied to real world problems, but also that research directions are informed by the needs of industry.

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Dr Riza Batista-Navarro
Natural Language Processing (CS)
University of Manchester

Riza Batista-Navarro is a Lecturer in the School of Computer Science of the University of Manchester. Her specialisation is in extracting information from text using natural language processing. Since 2010, she has gained experience in interdisciplinary work in terms of developing information extraction methods and applying them to biomedical use cases, e.g., cancer biology.

She has also taken an interest in developing research with socio-economic applications. In particular, she has started to work on employing text mining to improve delivery of information to natural disaster responders, enabling them to arrive at more informed choices in a timely and efficient manner.

UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Sandy Brownlee
Value-Added Optimisation (CS)
University of Stirling

Optimisation aims to make something better: perhaps faster, cheaper, or greener. By computational modelling, optimisation techniques churn through billions of possibilities to find improvements. Sandy has applied these techniques in diverse contexts: chemotherapy, low-carbon buildings, reducing aircraft delays, and improving software. He calls his own niche in this "Value-Added Optimisation", which combines approaches like evolutionary algorithms and machine learning to understand why particular solutions to a problem are good, and help people make better informed decisions.

Sandy has been employed in industry and by Robert Gordon, Loughborough and Stirling Universities, currently holding the post of Senior Research Assistant at the latter.

UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Sarah Clinch
Computing Architectures
University of Manchester

Sarah Clinch is a computer science researcher and lecturer in the University of Manchester. Her research focuses on the development and deployment of data-centric pervasive computing architectures for new and emerging application domains. Such application domains include augmented cognition, personalisation of the urban environment, and technology for health and wellbeing.

Sarah's research incorporates user and systems elements, and addresses concerns such as trust, privacy, security, and reliability; she has a strong interest in creating robust systems for long-term, real-world deployment. At Manchester, Sarah is a founding member of the pervasive computing "People to Data to Chips" theme.

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Dr Sean Walton
Evolutionary optimisation/ Computational Geometry
Swansea University

Sean is a Computer Science lecturer at Swansea University. He gained a PhD in Engineering at Swansea, and has experience as a secondary school science teacher. Sean’s primary research experience is in evolutionary optimisation and computational geometry. He was recently awarded a Sêr Cymru II fellowship to work with Rolls-Royce to develop techniques to digitise and simulate the performance of manufactured components prior to use.

Sean is increasingly interested in educational technology research and is currently investigating augmented reality as a teaching and learning tool. Outside academia Sean is director of an independent games development company, Pill Bug Interactive Ltd.

UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Simon Rowberry
Digital Media & Publishing
University of Stirling

Simon is Lecturer in Digital Media and Publishing at the University of Stirling. His research primarily focuses on the development of online reading communities, and the transition from print to digital publishing.

His research draws upon a range of methodologies including corpus linguistics, Science and Technology Studies, critical code studies, and social network analysis to offer insights into digital culture more broadly.

UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Steve Snow
Social Science/HCI
University of Southampton

Steve is a Research Fellow at the University of Southampton. Having completed a PhD investigating the social context of domestic energy use, his research interests have broadened towards human factors related to indoor air quality.

Steve worked in the environmental consulting industry before returning to academia in 2011, and has since published widely in the field of human-computer interaction. He is currently leading two undergraduate projects developing awareness systems for carbon dioxide build-up due to poor ventilation in naturally ventilated offices, as well as lecturing in Interaction Design. Working at the intersection of humans and technology, Steve’s goal is raising awareness and supporting behaviour change in energy use, ventilation practices and healthy living with digital technology.

UK Digital Economy Crucible 2016 Alumni photo
Dr Yvonne McDermott Rees
Human Rights, International Criminal Law & Procedure/Law
Swansea University (previously Bangor University)

Yvonne is currently Senior Lecturer in Law at Bangor University. Her research interests include human rights law, international criminal law, and international criminal procedure.

She is the author of Fairness in International Criminal Trials (Oxford University Press, 2016), as well as over 40 journal articles and book chapters. Her most recent research projects include a British Academy project on Evidence and Proof in International Criminal Trials, and an ESRC-funded enquiry into the legal and human rights implications of forced transparency, surveillance and sousveillance, as part of a multi-disciplinary team. Yvonne is an Academic Fellow of the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple.